Scientology Parent Video Blog #1 – Why Scientology & Parenting

When I was first planning to start this website, I was a naïve, brand-new parent, and had these amazing ideas of how I was going to be able to regularly edit together nice pro-quality videos with my nicer cam equipment, and do that regularly as a primary source of content.   Now, two years later, about 80% of my posts on the site have been done either after midnight when the kids and wifelet are out cold, or have been bashed out while riding the Metro into work. 

But, some things are easiest to communicate in a video, so I’m going to start cutting them.  And likely they’re mainly going to be done while I’m out walking the dog (no napping kids to disturb). 

So here you go – a first video blog entry, and an attempt at communicating why it was I started the site in the first place, and why I love applying Scientology as a parent. 

Let me know what you think in the comments – and let me know what else you’d like discussed on the site!

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3 Responses to “Scientology Parent Video Blog #1 – Why Scientology & Parenting”

  1. Briana Solani January 12, 2013 at 8:11 am #

    How do you feel about children as young as 12 joining the Sea Org?

    • Tad January 15, 2013 at 2:26 pm #

      Well, two answers for you. First, policies regarding children in the Sea Organization have changed throughout the years as the order matured. You should read up on the present policy regarding children in the Sea Org here.

      But to quote the relevant part:

      “Today, if an individual with minor-age children wishes to join the Sea Organization, the children must qualify for the Sea Organization and wish to join on their own determinism. The minimum age of Sea Organization members is generally the minimum age in any state or country that a person is legally permitted to work. The Church of Scientology adheres to all child labor laws and no underage Sea Organization members are permitted to perform tasks or to work hours longer than permitted by law.

      Minors are permitted to voluntarily join the Sea Organization, with the consent of a parent or a guardian approved by the parents. Once in the Sea Organization, if the minor’s parents are not also members of the Sea Org, the minor must then also have an assigned guardian approved by their parents.

      Schooling is provided at Sea Organization installations for minor Sea Organization members who still need to complete education requirements. These are minor Sea Organization members who are otherwise of an age whereby they are permitted to work, generally from 16 to 18 years of age. Where local laws regulate the number of hours a minor may work, their schedules are adjusted accordingly. Each jurisdiction is different. Schooling is provided for the legally required number of hours.”

      But you asked for my own opinion, so I’ll give it to you. I’ve been on staff myself, and when you’re on staff in a Scientology church or in the Sea Organization, you’re expected to be extremely competent at your job. To get competent, you have to study – a lot. Regardless of whether you’re someone who’s handling the printing & distribution of materials, or if you’re a Scientology counselor, you’re expected to be quite good at what you do. If you’re unable to become competent, it’s not too fun to do ANY job, much less the highly-demanding work in the Sea Org or on staff. As such, for my own kids, I really want to make sure they’re well-educated before they dive into whatever career they’re going to have. And whilst I’ve seen people finish their entire high-school curriculum at the age of 14 in some cases, by & large most kids are not going to have completed enough education to actually understand much of what they’re going to learn in Scientology or on-the-job training, if they start working at such a young age.

      So, for me, I’m planning on ensuring my kids are well-educated before getting on with their lives, whatever their career choices may be. And whilst I’m not going to put a hard age-cap on that like, “they MUST be 18 before I let them go!!” I’m also going to say that 12 is way, way too young.

  2. Ed Berwick January 13, 2013 at 5:58 am #

    I’ve always been an expert at putting my foot in my mouth, so here goes:

    Ummmm.

    Instead of starting with problems and solutions, i think you need to start with

    “What is an ideal scene?”

    and expand from there

    I should explain.

    I’m one half of our children’s in-law’s version of “Grandparents from Hell.”

    With my wife physically holding one of our daughter in laws, my daughter and I walked the daughter in law’s two children into the mighty Pacific Ocean, in waves that were about a foot, up to their knees. Our daughter in law was so afraid of her children going near the water, much less in it.

    Her two kids were afraid of walking 100 feet down the street.

    The only subjects they could talk about were TV characters.

    My wife was a former national record holder in several swimming events. She’s a Class Vlll.

    (Here’s where the “ideal scene” kicks in.)

    We raised our kids to be brave, skillful, smart, independent, resourceful individuals.

    When one of our boys was 12, I took him rock climbing in Yosemite up the Two Sisters climb. It’s about 2,000 feet or more.

    We had our kids skiing at age 2.

    We’ve taken them surfing and scuba diving.

    They all had a horse to ride from the time they were babies.

    There is an Oriental game called “Go.” While chess can be modeled and played expertly by computers, Go cannot. When our youngest daughter was in sixth grade, she would play Go with me quite often. One afternoon, a friend of mine, who reported to a guy named Steve Jobs at a local computer company, sat down to play Go with my daughter. He and I had played Go for a decade or more. He thought he’d just be a gentle and kind adult, and play nicely with her. he quickly realized that she was a really strong player. He really put a lot of thought into each and every move he made. in the end, she won. He told everyone about being beaten by a kid at Go for months.

    That same kid, today has a graduate degree from Stanford, and works directly for the Prime Minister of a nation in the Western Hemisphere.

    She also has a license that says she is a scuba instructor.

    She has loads of ribbons, buckles, trophies for her equestrian contests.

    She’s in her 30s, and has been a member of SAG and AFTRA (the performing unions) since she was four.

    She surfs and skis with boys on an equal level.

    There’s way more, but you get the idea.

    my wife and I had a picture of an ideal scene for raising children.

    We had outcomes that we expected based on each of our individual children’s hopes, dreams, skills, abilities, and interests. We never wanted cookie cutter kids. We wanted them to be themselves, but pushing their envelopes. We’ve done Ok on that score.

    So now we’re working on their mates, and their children.

    The grandchildren, who I started out describing, are now 12 and 15. They have traveled the world to Japan, Europe, Australia, to name a few. They both ski excellently. I took the boy, when he was 6 off his first cornices on a black diamond run. their mother now skis pretty well, and is four square behind my wife and I for what we have contributed to their overall household.

    Every Sunday, all of the kids and grandchildren that are around come to our house to eat, talk, and play.

    These older grandchildren show the younger grandchildren how to go schussing down the hill on their skateboards. We don’t raise or praise wusses. Web encourage getting out there and doing something.

    But just let me repeat myself:

    We started with an ideal scene which we completely agreed upon. We tweaked it a bit along the way, but not very much.

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